Breaking 100

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By JDuran

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  • 11 Replies
  1. Military

    First time poster, long time viewer. I’ve been playing golf for a few years and I just can’t seem to break 100. I average 1-2 pars a round, an occasional birdie, but I’m mainly making bogey or double bogey on most holes. My biggest score card killer is I’ll get 3-4 absolute blow up holes. How can I limit them/eliminate them? I really want to break 100.

  2. JoeyD

    JoeyD
    Texas

    Define "blow up holes" better for us. I know people who blow up because they can't keep it in play off the tee and others who get off the tee fine but chunk every shot into the green multiple times per hole and others still who get to greenside just fine but blade and chunk wedges around the green or 3,4 or even 5 putt from 20 feet. Knowing your weaknesses is the only way anyone can help you improve.
  3. Military
    It’s a mix between hitting a bad tee shot and then having to recover and then topping the recovery shot. Or I’ll hit a great tee shot and then top 2 in a row or hit it OB. And I’ll end up finishing the hole double over par.
  4. JoeyD

    JoeyD
    Texas

    First i would implement a little course management. If there's O.B. on a hole (and if it's possible to avoid it somehow) then identify it and aim away from it and/or play a club that will absolutely not reach it under any circumstance. If you are really looking to improve your scores you have to put pride aside and play smart. Two shorter shots into a green will always improve your chances of a lower score rather than having to take a stroke and distance penalty. Work on your swing on the range, not on the course. Play the shots AND clubs you know you can execute well on the course. If your driver is whats giving you the most problems then try a 3-wood teed up low or a hybrid or even a long iron off the tee until you work out your problems on the range. I had a problem topping balls many years ago and i just couldn't figure it out. I was hitting balls with the club champion of Colonial before a round (the only time I ever had the chance to play that course) and I was topping shots and told him I just couldn't figure it out. I told him I was trying to stay down on it but it felt like I was lifting up through impact. He told me somewhat cryptically...it took me a while to decipher what he was saying...that maybe my body was making me top the shots. I figured out that it was my posture that he was talking about. Specifically bending incorrectly at the waist and not with the pelvis at the hip flexors. If you aren't using your pelvis correctly the speed of the swing forces your body to stand up through the shot instead of retaining your spine angle. So maybe see if that's whats happening with you. It could be something more simple like the ball being too far forward in your stance or a reverse pivot causing you to top the ball but I always start with looking at Posture, Grip, Alignment, Ball Position. You can't work on other swing faults if those are fundamentally flawed. So start there. To me topping the ball would indicate that you aren't retaining your spine angle through impact (some people incorrectly call this "looking up") or you are not transferring your weight to your lead side correctly perhaps because of a reverse pivot or just lack of a good transition move. Either way, if your weight is staying on your trail side and your upper body's center of rotation (your sternum) is behind the ball at impact your swing arc will be moving up through impact instead of down through impact. All things you would need to analyze or work with a swing coach to pinpoint. I like to work things out myself but thats just me. Hope something in this helps. Always happy to help people make the game more enjoyable!
  5. Don O

    Don O
    Madison, WI

    There is a lot to be said for lessons. That aside, maybe you need to curb your inner Phil. Hit a bad drive? Don’t try to recover it all in the next shot. Hit a shot you can control to a distance you can then control to be on the green. This can include a pitch shot from deep rough back to the fairway.
    If you are trying to cover with a 3 wood that you only make contact and hit straight 1 out of 5 times, leave it at home until you can do better.
    If you top/chunk a shot. Take a practice swing that is better, then forget about the last as you approach the next.
    Setting up for a bogey beats trying to save par when your handicap is not a single digit
  6. Military
    I really like this idea. Next round I’ll definitely try this!
  7. JNoble89

    JNoble89
    Wisconsin

    I was in the same camp as you at the beginning of last season, and one thing that helped me mentally as I was working towards breaking 100 was just allowing myself an extra stroke on every hole, regardless of par. It takes the pressure off of feeling like I need to hit the green in two strokes on a par 4, etc. Bogey golf is an even 90, which is another thing to keep in mind.

    Keeping the ball in play off the tee box made a big difference for me as well. I would add a good handful of penalty strokes from going OB off the tee. I took a couple lessons to get drills to work on to help improve my swing and that helped a lot.

    When you hit your recovery shot, are you hitting it with the goal of just getting back into play even if it means hitting it laterally or even backwards? I used to try and advance the ball at all costs and would often just end up in a worse spot.

    If your chipping and putting is solid, work on figuring out what is causing your miss off the tee, and try the mental approach of giving yourself an extra stroke on every hole. Hopefully it'll lead to less of the disastrous holes and more bogeys and pars!
  8. By all means I'm not a pro as I only started playing a few years ago as well. What has been helping me more are 2 things. 1. not trying to absolutely destroy every ball...lightened by grip, slowed my swing speed down a bit and let the club do the work. 2. i really tried to work on my putting over the winter. learned what putting at 3ft, 6ft, 9ft, and 12ft felt like (this was in my basement so had to learn more when the season started with uneven terrain). I also tried to learn more about reading greens...not the best but i'm understanding it much more and it's leading to less doubles and triples
  9. As a struggler to break 100 for a number of years. I can honestly say course management and being realistic in my abilities of what I can or cannot do made the difference.

    It's easy to say get lessons, but I got comfortable with 3 clubs in my bag that I could turn to given most situations and driver wasn't one of them.

    Maybe even study the course map before a round and go in with a game plan with those 3 favorite clubs.

    Good luck and keep us posted!!
  10. mj

    mj
    Coquitlam, BC

    To improve score, so important to see where ur misses are; your tee shots including Fairways hit…when missing fairways, you loose both stroke and distance ( chipping out or having to lay up). Missing fairways also means not being able to go for greens. For me personally, I find driver off tee is important to me.
    Also eliminating mental mistakes, like chunks around the green. And of course dreaded 3 putts.
    Tough to have all parts of ur game show up, but playing within ur means…and knowing your distances.
    Just my 2 cents….but practice..practice ..practice
    Good luck in ur journey
  11. DK

    DK
    Doylestown, PA

    Course management and smart play is easiest. Play within YOUR ability. And find a pencil with a good eraser
  12. Military
    Thank you everyone for the responses and advice! I’ll do my best to implement the recommendations. I struggle with driver a lot actually so I usually hit 3 wood or hybrid off the tee depending on how I’m feeling that day. After reading everyone’s responses I took a second to think about what I do often when I end up topping 2-3 shots in a row and I think I try to make more out of a shot than I need to. Even when I have a good tee shot I mess up the second shot by trying to go for the “hero shot” and go for the GIR on a par 4 even if it’s 200+ yards out when I can just hit a nice easy shot and not put myself in a higher pressure situation by having to hit a longer club with more accuracy than I’m capable of. Also I totally agree with the point of not trying to recover all the yards lost on a recovery shot when I probably am not capable of since I’m probably in a bad lie and position.

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